Challenges and rewards of going to school full-time

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Challenges and rewards of going to school full-time

For beginning college students taking a full-time course load can be overwhelming. but it has its benefits. (The Inquirer file photo).

For beginning college students taking a full-time course load can be overwhelming. but it has its benefits. (The Inquirer file photo).

For beginning college students taking a full-time course load can be overwhelming. but it has its benefits. (The Inquirer file photo).

For beginning college students taking a full-time course load can be overwhelming. but it has its benefits. (The Inquirer file photo).

Micheal Sullivan, Staff member

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Taking on 12 credits or more a semester has its ups and downs. Balancing class attendance, personal life and homework can present a stressful juggling act for students with full schedules. But for some, the busy life is ideal.

“Going to DVC full time can help improve work ethic and self-discipline by forcing you to keep on top of all the work assigned,” said freshman English major Melissa Roe.

Going to school daily poses a range of struggles. A full course load can at times feel mind-boggling. But the benefits are clear: students get to be apart of a small community when they attend classes regularly, learn and acquire different skills, and can better understand each others’ goals.

Taking on more units also pays off for many students because it racks up credits at a faster pace, bringing them closer to their eventual transfer. Matthew Moynihan, a communications major in his second year at DVC, has gone full-time both years. He said his objective is transferring to a four-year university quickly.

“If you want to transfer to your school of choice as soon as possible, I highly recommend going full time,” said Moynihan.

Adjusting to college after high school can also be stressful. According to Roe, having a full schedule can be overwhelming at first. But the more a student gets used to having a lot on the plate, the better equipped they are to handle stressful situations.

Ailish Walsh is a fourth-year communications major and has committed to school both part-time and full-time. She thinks the full course load is most worthwhile.

“There are benefits and downfalls of being a full-time student,” said Walsh, “but if students are committed and have the time, the outcome is worth it.”

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