Diablo Valley College Closes As Cases of COVID-19 Grow

Many+DVC+student+workers+rely+on+income+from+their+campus+jobs+to+pay+their+bills+and+manage+other+living+costs.+%28Pavlina+Markova%2FThe+Inquirer%29.

Many DVC student workers rely on income from their campus jobs to pay their bills and manage other living costs. (Pavlina Markova/The Inquirer).

Cheasanee Hetherington, Staff member

As confirmed cases of COVID-19 continue to rise in Contra Costa County, Diablo Valley College announced March 15 that the campus will be closed to all students starting March 18.

The closure’s duration is currently unknown. A faculty email from communications and marketing director Chrisanne Knox said DVC is monitoring the situation and looking to “minimize the spread of this virus and reduce the impact COVID-19 may have on … programs and services.”

On March 3 Contra Costa Health Services confirmed the county’s first case of COVID-19, and by March 16 the number grew to 34.

In preparation for the closure, teachers began uploading curriculum online last week. Instructors should contact students by March 18 with additional information regarding remote instruction. More details regarding activity and lab classes, such as art or biology, should be expected within the upcoming week.

Multiple large campus events have been impacted by the closure, affecting gatherings between March 11 and April 25. A current list of canceled events can be found on DVC’s website.

The Health Advisory page on DVC’s website said that general community risk is “ still considered low, but we are taking this situation very seriously, and taking all possible measures to mitigate the health risks to the extent possible.” 

Community impact has grown beyond higher education. Mount Diablo Unified School District will be closing March 17. The closure will affect 36 school sites across Contra Costa County. Classes are expected to resume  April 13, after spring break.

“We do not make this decision lightly, as we understand that school closures can be difficult on our families,” said superintendent Dr. Robert Martinez. We believe that this decision is in the best interest of our students and we will continue to monitor the situation and to communicate openly with our community.”

More information is expected to come out the following week as “the situation is evolving on a daily basis,” as written on DVC’s Health Advisory webpage.