The Inquirer

What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

Students+in+music+production+classes+can+learn+to+keep+up+with+a+rapidly+changing+industry.
Back to Article
Back to Article

What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

Students in music production classes can learn to keep up with a rapidly changing industry.

Students in music production classes can learn to keep up with a rapidly changing industry.

Sarah Carr

Students in music production classes can learn to keep up with a rapidly changing industry.

Sarah Carr

Sarah Carr

Students in music production classes can learn to keep up with a rapidly changing industry.

Sarah Carr, Staff Member

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






This new way of listening to music has many aspects of the music industry changing. For those majoring in Music Industry Studies, this could mean a drastic change regarding their future career.

Tidal and Apple Music, the newest streaming services to emerge, claim that these platforms put up-and-coming artists in the same spotlight as the big players, and the small price that subscribers pay (compared to purchasing albums and songs individually) is beneficial for “everyone”.

Michael Aczon teaches Music Business courses here at DVC, currently teaching Introduction to the Music Industry this fall. He has an impressive background in the Music Industry, teaching Entertainment Law at the JFK School of Law and San Francisco Law School. He is also the author of  “The Musician’s Legal Companion”, a highly-regarded guide to navigating music business. Aczon’s professions make him a dynamic and valued faculty member to DVC.

“All music business courses change with new technology, since I’ve started here in 1996. That’s what keeps me young. It’s always changing.” Mr. Aczon responds in question of whether or not he’s applied changes to his course curriculum regarding streaming technology.

Aczon says that “new technology is not “designed” to fit anyone. Sure, the leveling of the playing field by allowing anyone to get their music out there sounds like a good idea and IS a good idea. The curation of what’s distributed is what is key…the biggest thing that they have to do is cut through the noise. Those with the resources to promote are probably going to stay ahead of the game. And it’s always been that way”, regarding the claims that music streaming services make about how they benefit the smaller artists as much as the larger ones.

For music majors, streaming technology is an important part of the bigger picture. “The classes that we have here give people an over-view…I think it’s important that it’s incorporated in the big picture.”

“There was a time when the majority of the money was made from some version of the sales of the music, bit it’s not anymore. You have to take things into account, like, now that I have my music out there, how do I monetize the rest of it?”

Streaming technology giving everyone an even chance of being heard has presented new challenges of self-marketing for many artists attempting to break through. When asked on these new pressures of an artist marketing themselves more, Aczon replied with “that is the biggest pressure now. Since it’s available, and since you can compete that way now, the biggest pressure for the artists and their teams and their labels, is how to promote.”

With streaming platforms equalizing the distribution of music for all artists, Music Industry Studies is changing and adapting to the new world of music. Michael Aczon is aware, and prepared for those changes, and plans on making sure his students are as well.

 

 

 

 

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
About the Contributor
Sarah Carr, Staff member

Staff member, fall 2015.

Leave a Comment

By commenting, you give The Inquirer permission to quote, reprint or edit your words. Comments should be brief, have a positive or constructive tone, and stay on topic. If the commenter wants to bring something to The Inquirer’s attention, it should be relevant to the DVC community. Posts can politely disagree with The Inquirer or other commenters. Comments should not use abusive, threatening, offensive or vulgar language. They should not be personal attacks or celebrations of other people’s tragedies. They should not overtly or covertly contain commercial advertising. And they should not disrupt the forum. Editors may warn commenters or delete comments that violate this policy. Repeated violations may lead to a commenter being blocked. Public comments should not be anonymous or come from obviously fictitious accounts. To privately or anonymously bring something to the editors’ attention, contact them.

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Left
  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    New Audio Visual Technology Associate Degree offered at DVC

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    New silent orchestra strums artistic dialogue

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    ‘The Not-Dying Girl’: The legacy of Lauren McCullough

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    ROV Team continues to assemble robots during winter break

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    From Oklahoma to California, then Peru

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    Navigating the depths of Monterey Bay

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    DVC Veteran Alliance solidifies student-veteran bond with new art exhibit

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    Rock and hip hop concert brings the ruckus to DVC

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    Rainbow Community Center advocates for LGBTQ+ students

  • What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC

    Features

    The ‘Spooky Film Festival’ scares its way to campus

Navigate Right
The student news site of Diablo Valley College.
What the future of music streaming could mean for DVC