The student news site of Diablo Valley College.

The Inquirer

The student news site of Diablo Valley College.

The Inquirer

The student news site of Diablo Valley College.

The Inquirer

“Careless World” is careless pop-rap

 (Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)
(Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons)

Rapper Tyga’s song “Rack City” has been on the Billboard charts for 12 weeks as of February 21 and is still in the top ten songs.

 If you haven’t heard that song before, all you need to know is that literally half the song consists of Tyga repeating the phrase “Rack City, bitch” over a three note synthesizer melody from nobody producer DJ Mustard. It’s delightfully ignorant.

However, the 17 other songs (along with three interludes) on Tyga’s major label debut “Careless World: Rise of the Last King” sound nothing at all like “Rack City.” In fact, half of the songs seem to be love songs.

I use the word “seems” because a lot of these songs are forgettable. I’ve listened to this album twice in less than a day and I can only remember “Rack City,” “Muthaf***a Up” as it has one of the most irritating productions I’ve heard in a rap song, and “Let It Show” as it has one of the best productions I’ve heard in a while.

However, the sheer number of guest stars on the album is memorable. Expect appearances from Lil Wayne, Big Sean, T-Pain, Nicki Minaj, Birdman, Robin Thicke, Busta Rhymes, Chris Brown, Wale, Nas, and J. Cole. The guest rappers all deliver the goods and back up Tyga rather well, especially J. Cole and Nas in particular.

One of the main problems with the album is with Tyga himself. While he has good flow and a nice sounding voice, Tyga doesn’t say many clever things.

He makes a joke about “beef” and high quality meat products in two different songs and he uses the same pun about a “cold world” and “heat” that J Cole uses in his guest verse, although Cole uses the phrase “Cole World” instead.

In addition, I’m not sure what kind of persona Tyga wants to show to the world. While not every rapper has to act like he’s Jesus Christ (like Jay-Z and Kanye West) or Scrooge McDuck (like Rick Ross), they should keep a sort of unity in how they present themselves. Tyga comes across as someone from a “Grand Theft Auto” game in songs like “Rack City,” but then he’ll turn around and be a sympathetic protagonist in songs like “Let It Show” and “Love Game.”

Tyga can handle both personas decently and he’s obviously doing this to appeal to everyone, but he doesn’t attempt to reconcile them at all. It is possible to do so: see Jay-Z’s “Song Cry.”

Because of these mood swings, listening to this album feels like a disjointed experience.

Leave a Comment
About the Contributor
John Kesler, Opinion editor
Opinion editor, spring 2012. Staff member, fall 2011.

Comments (0)

By commenting, you give The Inquirer permission to quote, reprint or edit your words. Comments should be brief, have a positive or constructive tone, and stay on topic. If the commenter wants to bring something to The Inquirer’s attention, it should be relevant to the DVC community. Posts can politely disagree with The Inquirer or other commenters. Comments should not use abusive, threatening, offensive or vulgar language. They should not be personal attacks or celebrations of other people’s tragedies. They should not overtly or covertly contain commercial advertising. And they should not disrupt the forum. Editors may warn commenters or delete comments that violate this policy. Repeated violations may lead to a commenter being blocked. Public comments should not be anonymous or come from obviously fictitious accounts. To privately or anonymously bring something to the editors’ attention, contact them.
All The Inquirer Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Activate Search
“Careless World” is careless pop-rap